Mobile First – A book review

Having bought the Mobile First the day it was released, it’s taken an age to get round to finally reading it.

Having bought the Mobile First the day it was released, it’s taken an age to get round to finally reading it.

Mobile First

Ironically, I ended up finding the best place to leave and dip into the book was actually in the bathroom, scene of much my unhurried mobile browsing and book reading. Now I’ve got the chance to briefly reflect on what I gained from reading the book and what you might too if you’ve not bought it already.

Author Luke Wroblewski is one the people I often refer to when looking up mobile development practice and technique, his blog is a rich source of information and constant updates and perhaps it’s because for the most part, my learning and workflow seldom relies on hard copies of books that I found Mobile First turned out to be a nice reminder of technique but of more interest to me was actually a bit of a background overview of what’s happened in mobile so far and what’s happening (TL;DR: Everything is changing all the time) that I probably won’t find myself dipping in and out of the book again as people often do with reference books.

Most of my learning is done through following the people I do on Twitter and subscribing to an ever growing series of RSS feeds from designers and developers who push the envelope and innovate as well as experiment.

The book does highlight and explain a lot of interesting history and development but perhaps because I left it a while to read, much of the information within has been disseminated around the net in various forms. That’s not to say I know it all, not by a long stretch, just that the parts relevant to my work were things I’d seen.

The information on Gestures, apps and HUI was especially interesting as I’m still very much building responsive websites, not apps or hybrids and there is a wealth of good advice and guidelines on input methods and techniques I’ll be making use of.

It’s well written, concise and shows good examples. As you’d expect from Luke and A List Apart.

Definitely worth buying but if you’re already working on responsive websites I’d perhaps venture to say you might find that some parts already discuss things you’ve come across in your work but of course that doesn’t apply to everyone!

Posted 2 years ago on · Permalink